Friday, November 1, 2013

Giveaway: The Night Guest by Fiona MacFarlane

The Night Guest
by Fiona MacFarlane

A mesmerizing first novel about trust, dependence, and fear, from a major new writer

Ruth is widowed, her sons are grown, and she lives in an isolated beach house outside of town. Her routines are few and small. One day a stranger arrives at her door, looking as if she has been blown in from the sea. This woman—Frida—claims to be a care worker sent by the government. Ruth lets her in.

Now that Frida is in her house, is Ruth right to fear the tiger she hears on the prowl at night, far from its jungle habitat? Why do memories of childhood in Fiji press upon her with increasing urgency? How far can she trust this mysterious woman, Frida, who seems to carry with her own troubled past? And how far can Ruth trust herself?

The Night Guest, Fiona McFarlane’s hypnotic first novel, is no simple tale of a crime committed and a mystery solved. This is a tale that soars above its own suspense to tell us, with exceptional grace and beauty, about ageing, love, trust, dependence, and fear; about processes of colonization; and about things (and people) in places they shouldn’t be. Here is a new writer who comes to us fully formed, working wonders with language, renewing our faith in the power of fiction to describe the mysterious workings of our minds.


--~ Book Giveaway ~--

WIN my review copy of this book!

Open to all.

Offer ends: November 17, 2013

TO DO:

READ the excerpt of this book here.

RETURN here and quote a sentence from the excerpt in comments.

AND, leave your email (if I don't already have it)

~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~

Contest has ended - winner is here

~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~

~~~ NIGHT NIGHT schedule ~~~


20 comments:

  1. I liked this one:

    "Through this symmetry—always begin a flight of stairs on her left foot, always end it on her right—she maintained the order of her days. If she had dinner ready in time for the six o’clock news, both of her sons would come home for Christmas."

    I think we all have a bit of this!


    You already have my email.
    :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. The tenderness was irresistible. saubleb(at)gmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  3. "She went to the kitchen, opened the shutters, and looked out at the sea. It lay waiting below the garden, and although she was unable to walk down to it—the dune was too steep, and her back too unpredictable—she felt soothed by its presence in an indefinable way, just as she imagined a plant might be by Mozart. The tide was full and flat across the beach" thanks for the giveaway. Emma ehc16e at yahoo dot com

    ReplyDelete
  4. I liked this one "Yes, it sounded just like that, like a tiger eating some large bloody thing, and yet the noise of it was empty and meatless. "
    twoofakind12@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  5. Loved the final sentence!

    "By the time Ruth reached the lounge-room window, there was no Frida and no taxi. The grass stood high in the winter garden, and there was no sound besides the sea."

    dr.strangelove.vs.citizen.kane
    @
    gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  6. The lounge room, when Ruth entered it in daylight, was benign. The furniture was all where it should be, civil, neat, and almost anxious for her approval, as if it had crossed her in some way and was now waiting for her forgiveness, dressed in its very best clothes. Ruth was oppressed by this wheedling familiarity. She crossed to the window and opened the lace curtains with a dramatic gesture.

    zeuksis [at] gmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  7. She went to the kitchen, opened the shutters and looked out at the sea. elliotbencan(at)hotmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  8. "Oh Ma, There's no tiger, it's either a cat or a dream"

    This one is on my wishlist!
    videoclimber(at)yahoo(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  9. “I can hear a tiger, not roaring, just panting and snorting." I love this. This book sounds great. michelle_willms(at)yahoo(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  10. This is amazing. Must read.

    "“Tiger Puts Pensioner on the Menu.” This delighted her; and there was another sensation, a new one, to which she attended with greater care: a sense of extravagant consequence. Something important, Ruth felt, was happening to her, and she couldn’t be sure what it was: the tiger, or the feeling of importance."

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

    ReplyDelete
  11. I liked this one : "It lay waiting below the garden, and although she was unable to walk down to it—the dune was too steep, and her back too unpredictable—she felt soothed by its presence in an indefinable way, just as she imagined a plant might be by Mozart. "

    ReplyDelete
  12. “Oh, Ma. There’s no tiger. It’s either a cat or a dream.”
    “I know that,” said Ruth. She knew there couldn’t be a tiger; but she wasn’t sure it was a dream. She was awake, after all. And her back hurt, which it never did in dreams. But now she noticed the noises had stopped. There was only the ordinary outside sound of the breaking sea.

    goncalo DOT mil AT gmail DOT com

    ReplyDelete
  13. She went to the kitchen, opened the shutters, and looked out at the sea. It lay waiting below the garden, and although she was unable to walk down to it—the dune was too steep, and her back too unpredictable—she felt soothed by its presence in an indefinable way, just as she imagined a plant might be by Mozart. The tide was full and flat across the beach.

    ritambsilva AT gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  14. “I can hear a tiger, not roaring, just panting and snorting. It’s like he’s eating, and also concentrating very hard.” So she knew he was a male tiger, and that was a comfort; a female tiger seemed more threatening.

    blackcapballistics AT gmail DOT com

    ReplyDelete
  15. Ruth sent one courageous hand out into the dark to find the phone on her bedside table. She pressed the button that was programmed to summon her son Jeffrey, who would, in his sensible way, be sleeping right now in his house in New Zealand. The telephone rang; Ruth, hearing the creak of Jeffrey’s throat as he answered the phone, was unrepentant.

    39.5susy AT gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  16. "She wasn’t telling him there was a tiger in her house; she was telling him she could hear one. That distinction seemed important, now that she was awake..." - Quote

    Thank you for this amazing giveaway, which i would love to be entered for.

    My Email is lfountain1(at)hotmail(dot)co(dot)uk

    ReplyDelete
  17. Sounds like a great read not to mention a fantastic cover. I like this line - Ruth ventured another “Hello?” and pictured, as she did so, the headlines: “Australian Woman Eaten by Tiger in Own House.”
    frellathon(at)gmail(dot)

    ReplyDelete
  18. She hated to sweep, hated anything so senseless; she hated to make her bed only to unmake it again in the evening.

    agcestrela [at] gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  19. The first few words are always the one's that should get to us, and these do!

    "Ruth woke at four in the morning and her blurry brain said “Tiger.” That was natural; she was dreaming. But there were noises in the house, and as she woke she heard them. They came across the hallway from the lounge room. "

    joanapatriciadias AT gmail DOT com

    ReplyDelete
  20. Ruth would have liked to know another language in order to revert to it at times of disproportionate frustration. She’d forgotten the Hindi she knew when, as a child, she lived in Fiji. Lately, swearing—in which she indulged in a mild, girlish way—was her other language.

    paginas(dot)memoria(at)gmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete

 
Imagination Designs
Images from: Lovelytocu