Tuesday, November 1, 2011

ABOUT Tribute Books by Nicole Langan


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by Nicole Langan
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Tribute Books began in 2004 and we've published over 30 titles since that time. Some of our books have gone on to win awards such as the Christian Small Publisher Book of the Year and the Mom's Choice Award while others were endorsed by PBS and The Thoreau Society. We've covered a wide range of genres from children's picture books to history to sports under both traditional and subsidy contracts.

In 2012, we will transition into being an ebook publisher for young adult titles. Over the course of 2011, we've watched our ebook sales outpace our print sales by 2 to 1 due to the explosion in popularity of e-readers such as the Kindle, Nook and iPad. The under $5 price point of most of our e-titles and the ease of purchase and delivery surely facilitated this rapid change.

Overall, our transition is based on three factors. On a business level, the young adult genre sells especially if it is well written and has a paranormal romance theme. On a marketing level, the devotion of the young adult fan base is unparalleled. On a personal level, I thoroughly enjoy a good young adult novel and review many on my blog at Tribute Books Reviews. I'm a believer in doing what you love and working with like-minded people, when it's at all possible.

Interested authors can submit their manuscripts via email to info@tribute-books.com. There will be no charge for the authors we select to work with, and they will receive 50% of the net profits of their ebook sales in quarterly royalty payments. We're looking for Microsoft Word documents with a maximum of 350 pages of text with no photos, charts, illustrations, graphs, etc. Manuscripts that have already been professionally edited will receive greater consideration. Our preference is to work with authors who have already been published through a royalty-paying press and who know the ins and outs of book promotion. An established social media platform is a must, and we will not consider writers who do not have a well-followed blog, Facebook page or Twitter account.

Our preference is for damn good writing, the particular topic is secondary in importance. However, books written with a series in mind or those that delve into the paranormal will have a slight edge. I'm most excited about working with authors who enjoy promoting their book on a daily basis. Ones who know the ins and outs of the time and effort it takes to make a book a success because I'm ready and willing to work with them every step of the way.

I am a big believer in the power of social media. I even conduct monthly blog tours for outside publishers and authors in order to help them increase the online presence of a book. Book bloggers are a powerful force in the book industry. With more and more book stores closing and book review columns being cut from major newspapers, readers are depending on bloggers to help them find the books they want to read. They are turning to the internet as a reference point to fill this information gap.

In my opinion, social networking is the bread and butter of any author's promotional efforts. Without it, it's like trying to paddle upstream without a canoe. Readers want to connect with the person who wrote the book. They crave interaction with an author. Nothing beats getting a writer to comment on a blogger's book review post or getting a personalized thank you tweet from your favorite author. The days of authors being isolated from their fans is over. They're now able to build an online following and receive instant feedback for their work. They have the opportunity to take part in creating their own literary community.

We try to keep an active online presence with our website, Facebook, Twitter and blog.

We'd love to have anyone who loves young adult literature to join us for the ride.

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Guest post by Nicole Langan from publisher, Tribute Books
© 2011. All rights reserved.

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by Nicole Langan
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--~ eBook Giveaway courtesy of publisher ~--

signup to win one of the ebooks below

Journey Along the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad:
Pictorial History of Pocono Mountain Boarding Homes,
Hotels, Inns & Resorts
from the Delaware Water Gap to Tobyhanna, Pennsylvania
by Alan Sweeney

Industrial Pioneers:
Scranton, Pennsylvania and
the Transformation of America,
1840-1902
by Patrick Brown


Gateway to the Clouds
The Story of a Short Line Railroad
The Scranton, Dunmore, Moosic Lake Railroad
1902-1926
by Alan and Judy Sweeney


Laurel Line:
An Anthracite Region Railway
by James N.J. Henwood and John G. Muncie

6 comments:

  1. Very informative post - thank you, Vii and Nicole!

    Personally, I find it a wee sad to see the decline of the printed book - although it certainly makes perfect sense on so many levels. Having worked several years at a newspaper, I'm well aware of the basic costs of paper/ink, let alone all the other myriad steps involved in producing printed material.

    I have to wonder - how {eventually} will the world of e-printing impact schools & public libraries? Hard to envision the end result, say, 50 years hence ... but I definitely think it will be inescapable at some point.

    Just curious as to what others think about this~

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  2. Velvet, thank you again for allowing me to contribute a guest post to your exceptional book blog. It's an honor and a privilege to be the recipient of your continued support.

    Good luck to all who enter the giveaway for our historical ebooks!

    M.A.D. - I agree with your sentiments. I, too, bemoan the impending cutbacks that the printed book is facing. It's a head vs. heart issue. The financial picture and technological shift favor the ebook, but die hard readers will always crave holding a real book in their hands.

    For education, I imagine the change will be similar to modern day college students and their laptop computers. Students will most likely be issued an iPad or some type of electronic reader at the beginning of the school year containing all of the ebooks they will need instead of receiving physical textbooks.

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  3. Very informative post.

    Do you plan on offering any of your future books in print copies? And if so, how would you decide what gets printed and what doesn't? Or would you make it so that the customer could order a print copy of the book as a seperate option?

    As for the idea of students being issues ipads or similar e-reader. As a parent I would be torn. I'd be overjoyed that there would be less for the kids to lug around in heavy backpacks. But I would also be terrified that they would damage it in some way and the cost of replacing it would be out of my price range.

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  4. Hi AimeeKay - thanks for commenting.

    Yes, all titles published from 2012 forward will only be available as ebooks. However, the titles we published from 2004 through 2011 will continue to be available for sale as hardcovers, paperbacks and ebooks.

    I think in terms of students and e-readers that they are going to come down significantly in price, and I'm sure a developer will make an extra durable model for the school markets. I'm sure at a group rate, most schools will be able to get a basic e-reader at perhaps $40-$50 per student. Selling in such mass quantities is sure to lower the price. And I bet some high school science textbooks cost more than that now.

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  5. In the long run, it would definitely help out schools financially if they could get the ereaders at a lower price due to mass quantities. Each kid could have their own copy to take home and study, not just one set for the classroom that the kids have to leave there. (This is worse than lugging 1000lb backpack since they only have that one class to look through the book).

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  6. I know the paranormal romance themed books are selling really heavily right now - but I kind of see it as a phase. I think some of us that read alot of the paranormal fiction - well I guess I can only speak for myself - but sometimes you hit burnout. The market seems so over saturated with it right now.
    Pabkins @ Mission to Read

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