Tuesday, June 14, 2011

bustlepunk pt2

Such books are the softer cousins of steampunk—historic romantic fantasies—and as a sub-genre, they are really coming into their own of late. -per The Bustlepunk Apocalypse Continues

Authors include:

Hidden Goddess
by M.K. Hobson
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- ends July 5

In a brilliant mix of magic, history, and romance, M. K. Hobson moves her feisty young Witch, Emily Edwards, from the Old West of 1876 to turn-of-the-nineteenth-century New York City, whose polished surfaces conceal as much danger as anything west of the Rockies.

Like it or not, Emily has fallen in love with Dreadnought Stanton, a New York Warlock as irresistible as he is insufferable. Newly engaged, she now must brave Dreadnought’s family and the magical elite of the nation’s wealthiest city. Not everyone is pleased with the impending nuptials, especially Emily’s future mother-in-law, a sociopathic socialite. But there are greater challenges still: confining couture, sinister Russian scientists, and a deathless Aztec goddess who dreams of plunging the world into apocalypse. With all they must confront, do Emily and Dreadnought have any hope of a happily-ever-after?

Twice a Hero
by Susan Krinard

Zack Rawlins didn't become the youngest president of the Bandera County Cattlemen's Association by backing down from a challenge.

So when beautiful but hot-tempered sheepherder Bailey McShane barged into the cattlemen's saloon and accused them of stealing precious water from her land, he waded into the fray...and came out in a heap of trouble.

With drought-stricken Bandera County on the brink of a range war, no self-respecting cattleman would be caught dead taking sides with a woman who raises sheep--but Zack can't stay away from this pint-size wildcat. Now he's facing two dangerous battles: one with a town full of stubborn ranchers at one another's throats; the other with an unpredictable woman who refuses to be tamed.

The Left Hand of Darkness
by Ursula K. LeGuin

Winner of the Hugo and Nebula Awards for Best Science Fiction Novel of the Year

A groundbreaking work of science fiction, The Left Hand of Darkness tells the story of a lone human emissary to Winter, an alien world whose inhabitants can change their gender. His goal is to facilitate Winter's inclusion in a growing intergalactic civilization. But to do so he must bridge the gulf between his own views and those of the completely dissimilar culture that he encounters. Embracing the aspects of psychology, society, and human emotion on an alien world, The Left Hand of Darkness stands as a landmark achievement in the annals of intellectual science fiction.

by Cherie Priest

Nurse Mercy Lynch is elbows deep in bloody laundry at a war hospital in Richmond, Virginia, when Clara Barton comes bearing bad news: Mercy’s husband has died in a POW camp. On top of that, a telegram from the west coast declares that her estranged father is gravely injured, and he wishes to see her. Mercy sets out toward the Mississippi River. Once there, she’ll catch a train over the Rockies and—if the telegram can be believed—be greeted in Washington Territory by the sheriff, who will take her to see her father in Seattle.

Reaching the Mississippi is a harrowing adventure by dirigible and rail through war-torn border states. When Mercy finally arrives in St. Louis, the only Tacoma-bound train is pulled by a terrifying Union-operated steam engine called the Dreadnought. Reluctantly, Mercy buys a ticket and climbs aboard.

What ought to be a quiet trip turns deadly when the train is beset by bushwhackers, then vigorously attacked by a band of Rebel soldiers. The train is moving away from battle lines into the vast, unincorporated west, so Mercy can’t imagine why they’re so interested. Perhaps the mysterious cargo secreted in the second and last train cars has something to do with it?

Mercy is just a frustrated nurse who wants to see her father before he dies. But she’ll have to survive both Union intrigue and Confederate opposition if she wants to make it off the Dreadnought alive.

Coronets and Steel
by Sherwood Smith

In this new fantasy series, a young woman takes her own destiny by the hand-and the hilt.

California girl Kim Murray is unsatisfied with grad school and restless in life. Modern men disappoint her, and she studies ballet and fencing because they remind her of older, more romantic times.

She lives with her parents and her beloved but secretive aristocratic grandmother, who speaks only French and refuses to share stories about the mysterious family she left behind in Europe, inspiring Kim to travel there and find her roots.

Kim soon finds herself swept up in an adventure of fantastic deceptions and passionate intrigue-and a shocking realization about her own bloodline that leaves her reeling.


* Let me know in comments which one of the above would you like to read to experience bustlepunk.

* image source

-=+ other punk schedule +=-


  1. Twice a Hero and Dreadnought both look really good.
    I love that picture for Bustlepunk, it makes me smile.

  2. Agreed. Those lady-snails are tres awesome - love the artwork!!!

    All the books sound great, but with a soft spot for Sci-Fi I'm definitely going with The Left Hand of Darkness :D

  3. I'd love to read Dreadnought or maybe Coronets and Steel.

  4. I read and enjoyed Coronets and Steel (I am a huge Sherwood Smith fan) and I just borrowed Dreadnought but haven't started it yet (just moved to the top of my list). I really, really want to read The Hidden Goddess. :)

    P.S. The snail lady is so cool!

  5. Hidden Goddess sounds fantastic! Thanks for the list of books.

  6. I never knew there was a name for the genre I didn't know I loved!! Can't wait to see the reviews for these books. So excited!

  7. I think Dreadnought looks cool. And I like Cherie Priest. :)

  8. Dreadnought is the only one I already have. I would love to read all the other books in the list. *_*

  9. The Left Hand of Darkness and The Hidden Goddess.


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